Marius Andre Aasly

Organic wine a growing trend

Marius Andre Aasly
Organic wine a growing trend

The first Organic vineyards were established after the Second World War, but it was not until the 1980`s that the interest in Organic wine started to grow. In 2013 4,6 percent of the worlds' vineyards where utilizing Organic principles in their vine growing. For a wine to become certified Organic the producer needs to follow a strict set of rules. The use of fertilizers and chemicals in the vineyard is not allowed and the wine needs a minimal industrial treatment before its bottled and released onto the market.

Without a license. However, there are many vinegrowers who only practices Organic viticulture without the certification. This is due to a high level of cost and a great deal of paperwork to both receive and maintain the certification. Scepsis towards fertilizers and chemical pesticides and a wish for healthier vines and a more natural cycle in the vineyard is the reason why vineyards all over the world are adopting this strategy.

 Source: winepleasures.com

Source: winepleasures.com

Just as safe. Even if the Organic wine movement is not using fertilizers or chemical pesticides there is no reason to believe that Organic wine is safer than any other types of wine, It is not proven that chemical pesticides in the vineyard end up in the finished wine. There is a strict regulation every winegrower has to follow when it comes to the amount of potentially toxic amounts in a finished wine regardless of production method or viticultural practices.

Sulfur preserves the wine. Another popular myth is that Organic wines are completely free of additives, this is not true. A great example is the use sulfur who has the important function of prolonging the shelf life of a wine and to protect against oxidation. Sulfur exists in all types of wine, however, the amount is often lower than in conventional wines. But compared to other foodstuff products the amount of sulfur in conventional wines as well is much lower. Take for example a box of raisins, the amount of sulfur it contains are a thousand times higher than wine.

No difference. Even though Organic Viticulture undoubtedly has a lot to offer, it is not possible to claim that Organic wine is of higher quality than conventional/traditional wine. In both cases, the quality is determined by the degree of work in the vineyard and in the cellar and not whether it is Organic or not.

 Source: Goodfood.com

Source: Goodfood.com

Marius has worked in several parts of the wine business for the last 16 years. He is currently working as a Category Coordinator for wine and spirits in the Travel Retail business. He is also a part of a tasting panel for the financial newspaper in Norway and writes articles and lectures in his spare time.Marius has a huge passion and dedication for the wine and spirits industry. He is a certified Sommelier and is currently undertaking the WSET Diploma in wines and spirits education.